Human Health and Safety Impacts of Recombinant Bovine Somatotropin Consumption

Posted Posted in Health and Medicine, News

By Danielle Kassatly, Genetics and Genomics, ’16 Author’s Note: “This piece aspires to encourage consumers to critically interpret the scientific facts presented in everyday advertisements. Our society assumes that rBST and many other synthetic chemicals are detrimental to health, this essay emphasizes the importance of challenging fallacious argument in order to fairly evaluate the use of rBST.”

Winter Seminar 2016: “Science Journalism and Editing: The Aggie Transcript”

Posted Posted in News

The Aggie Transcript is offering its first-ever seminar on science journalism and editing in Winter Quarter 2016! Please see the flyer below for more information. To read more about the course description, the goals of the seminar, course assignments and grading criteria, please visit the link and click “Seminar Schedule: Winter 2016” Link: http://fys.ucdavis.edu/student/#frs-schedule

What is LASIK?

Posted Posted in News

By David Ivanov, Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 2015 LASIK, or laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis, is a surgical procedure commonly used to correct for visual defects or lack of visual clarity. Commonly referred to as laser eye surgery, LASIK is a type of surgery that is used to alleviate visual loss associated with common defects of the eye, such as myopia […]

A Work In Progress

Posted Posted in News

By Shadeh Ghaffari-Rafi, Neurobiology, Physiology, & Behavior, ’16 At first, Jerry’s expected springtime pollen allergies didn’t bother him or seem unusual. His allergies caused mild nosebleeds, which he would stop by pinching his nose for five minutes. This past year, however, the bleeding didn’t stop. Five years ago, Jerry relocated to Iowa for work, as the company he worked for […]

Can Polio Cure Cancer?

Posted Posted in News

By Briga Mullin, Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, ’15 The human body’s immune system has been developed to successfully battle foreign invaders including bacteria, parasites, and viruses. Immunotherapy is the idea that the power of the immune system can be utilized against diseases such as cancer. Typically, the immune system does not harm the body’s own cells, preventing it from being […]

Bhutan Rice Fields

Posted Posted in News

By Elizabeth Ridolfi This is a photograph of the rice fields in Bhutan, where I did a 6- week field research program through the School for Field Studies in Summer 2014. Bhutan is a small, Himalayan country located near India and Nepal.The spread of rice cultivation in Bhutan is an illustration the effect of global climate change. Rice typically grows in […]

AGGIE TRANSCRIPT IS RECRUITING FOR SPRING 2015!

Posted Posted in News

Interested in both science and writing? Want some practical experience managing a student-run life sciences journal? Consider applying to the editorial board of the Aggie Transcript, an undergraduate life sciences journal run by UC Davis students! Editors are expected to solicit and review submission articles, as well as to submit their own pieces of original writing. This is an excellent […]

Vector and Disease Management Research to Reduce the Effects of Pierce’s Disease in California’s Vineyards

Posted Posted in Environment, News

By Natalie Swinhoe, Anthropology and Evolution, Ecology, and Biodiversity, 2015 Pierce’s Disease in grapevines is a major threat to California’s viticultural economy. Caused by the bacterial strain Xylella fastidiosa, the disease blocks water transfer in the xylem of stems, leading to water stress and eventual death. Until the 1990s, the only carriers for the disease were native Blue-Green Sharpshooters, Graphocephala […]

A Breakthrough in Breast Cancer Treatment

Posted Posted in Genetics, News

 Exciting, new gene therapy treatments for breast cancer are on the verge of making a breakthrough. With proper funding, these procedures could reduce the need for the surgical removal of organs. By Rayan Kaakati, Neurobiology, Physiology, and Behavior Being born female automatically enters one in a game of Russian roulette: About 1 in 8 women will develop invasive breast cancer […]

SV2A is a Galactose Transporter

Posted Posted in News

By Marisa Sanchez, Molecular and Cellular Biology ’15 SV2A is a synaptic vesicle protein, which participates in the regulation of neurotransmitter release in humans. SV2A is expressed in neurons and endocrine cells. The exact function of SV2A is still unknown, but it has been identified that SV2A is the binding site for the antiepileptic drug, levetiracetam. Levetiracetam reduces presynaptic glutamate […]