Information Night for The Aggie Transcript

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2017 is a new year and can be a time to explore undergraduate publishing. Come learn more about The Aggie Transcript! If you are interested in finding out who we are, how to become an editor, or how to get a submission published, come out to our info night! Light refreshments will be provided. We hope to see you there! Date, Time and Location: 1/17 from 7:10-8pm Wellman 27

Blueberries and Breast Cancer Treatment

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By Shivani Kamal, Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, ’17 Author’s Note: “I originally became interested in the potential anti-cancer effects of blueberries when I took a nutrition seminar my first year at UC Davis. Curious about further research on its effects on breast cancer, I decided to write an article to educate other students about it. Many of us either have a family member or know someone diagnosed with cancer, so spreading knowledge of current cancer research is an important reminder of support, hope, and determination to individuals and their families.”

Mitofusin 2 as a Mammalian ER-Mitochondria Tether? A Review

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By Lauren Uchiyama, Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, ’17 Author’s Note: “I chose to write this piece to familiarize myself with the most recent scientific literature on Mitofusin 2 for my UWP104E Writing in Science class. I was preparing to apply for the Undergraduate Research Center Provost Undergraduate Fellowship and felt this would be a good way to inform myself about a protein related to my own undergraduate project in Jodi Nunnari’s lab.  I was puzzled that different experiments could lead to such conflicting findings on the same issue; thus, writing this review was an invaluable learning experience for me as both an undergraduate student and scientist.”

Exploring the Known Unknowns Using the Power of Metagenomics: Discovery of the crAssphage

Posted Posted in Environment, Genetics, News

By Connie Chen, Microbiology, ’15-’16 Author’s Note: “Metagenomics is the study of genetic material directly from environmental samples such as the soil or the human gut. With whole metagenomic sequencing, it is possible to obtain and analyze every piece of genetic material in the sample. As we being to learn more about the world, it becomes evident that there is more that is unknown. The crAssphage is an example of a “known unknown” because through metagenomics, the virus’s genome has been built and certain properties can be interpreted from the genome, but it has never been seen under a microscope and there is much still unknown about the virus. Metagenomics have opened the doors to analyzing multiple sequences and determining […]

The Infant Airway Microbiome Linked to Childhood Asthma

Posted Posted in Environment, Genetics, Health and Medicine, News

By Shivani Kamal, Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, ’17 Author’s Note: “I am pursing a career in pediatrics and wanted to familiarize myself with new research regarding health and development of children. I was amazed at the advancements of medical technology which allow us to understand diseases and create potential cures, previously never thought possible. My purpose for writing this review is to show scientific audiences the most current research on how bacteria in the respiratory microbiome has an impact on asthma. Recently, much research initiated by the Human Microbiome Projects (HMP) proved that the bacteria living on and inside humans contribute to the health and disease of the body. This review is meant to educate scientists on the most recent information […]

Human Health and Safety Impacts of Recombinant Bovine Somatotropin Consumption

Posted Posted in Health and Medicine, News

By Danielle Kassatly, Genetics and Genomics, ’16 Author’s Note: “This piece aspires to encourage consumers to critically interpret the scientific facts presented in everyday advertisements. Our society assumes that rBST and many other synthetic chemicals are detrimental to health, this essay emphasizes the importance of challenging fallacious argument in order to fairly evaluate the use of rBST.”

Winter Seminar 2016: “Science Journalism and Editing: The Aggie Transcript”

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The Aggie Transcript is offering its first-ever seminar on science journalism and editing in Winter Quarter 2016! Please see the flyer below for more information. To read more about the course description, the goals of the seminar, course assignments and grading criteria, please visit the link and click “Seminar Schedule: Winter 2016” Link: http://fys.ucdavis.edu/student/#frs-schedule

What is LASIK?

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By David Ivanov, Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 2015 LASIK, or laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis, is a surgical procedure commonly used to correct for visual defects or lack of visual clarity. Commonly referred to as laser eye surgery, LASIK is a type of surgery that is used to alleviate visual loss associated with common defects of the eye, such as myopia (nearsightedness), hypermetropia (farsightedness), and astigmatism. Astigmatism, like near and far-sightedness, can be caused by the irregularity in shape of the cornea that leads to blurred vision. For all three cases, corneal remodeling via LASIK can be performed (Thomson, 2015). The cornea is the outermost layer of the eye, the transparent part that one can touch, and upon which contact lenses […]

A Work In Progress

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By Shadeh Ghaffari-Rafi, Neurobiology, Physiology, & Behavior, ’16 At first, Jerry’s expected springtime pollen allergies didn’t bother him or seem unusual. His allergies caused mild nosebleeds, which he would stop by pinching his nose for five minutes. This past year, however, the bleeding didn’t stop. Five years ago, Jerry relocated to Iowa for work, as the company he worked for in California closed. For the past five years, everyday, Jerry has been taking two pills, one to alleviate his heart rate, blood pressure, and heart strain and another to lower his blood cholesterol. His doctor recommended that Jerry occasionally take low dose aspirin so his blood would flow more easily, he would feel less chest pain, and avoid blood clots […]

Can Polio Cure Cancer?

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By Briga Mullin, Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, ’15 The human body’s immune system has been developed to successfully battle foreign invaders including bacteria, parasites, and viruses. Immunotherapy is the idea that the power of the immune system can be utilized against diseases such as cancer. Typically, the immune system does not harm the body’s own cells, preventing it from being extremely effective against cancer. However with different medical interventions to strengthen the body’s immune response, it is possible to get an effective treatment (Cancer Immunotherapy 2015). A unique and exciting branch of immunotherapy involves oncolytic viruses, genetically modified viruses that are used to infect tumor cells and fight cancer (Vile, Ando, and Kirn 2002). One example of an oncolytic virus […]