The Genetic Basis of Nicotine Addiction

Posted Posted in Health and Medicine: Literature Reviews

By: Anh Nguyen, Microbiology, ’17 Author’s Note This article is a synthesis of research that I have found about the genetic basis of nicotine addiction. The purpose of this piece is to thoroughly inform the reader. In this article I will discuss how genetic variation affects nicotine dependence, review studies which examine the effects of this genetic variation, and discuss how genetic variation can influence the likelihood of other diseases. This article aims to follow an individual’s encounter with nicotine, starting with the first encounter of a cigarette to an examination of other diseases related to smoking. The sections below provide an explanation of the specific experiments which examined how nicotinic receptor genes  affect an individual’s response to nicotine.

WE’RE ALL GOING TO DIE, BUT WILL IT BE VIA MASS EXTINCTION?

Posted Posted in Narrative and Personal Writing, News

By N.J. Griffen, English, ’17 Author’s Note: “Stephen Hawking at the end of last year wrote an article for The Guardian saying: ‘…we are at the most dangerous moment in the development of humanity. We now have the technology to destroy the planet on which we live, but have not yet developed the ability to escape it. Perhaps in a few hundred years, we will have established human colonies amid the stars, but right now we only have one planet, and we need to work together to protect it.’ In spirit of Hawking’s eerie warning to humanity, I chose to write this article to consider the variable possibility of a self-imposed extinction of humanity.”

Ants Who Farm: The Evolution of Fungal Obligate Symbiosis

Posted Posted in Narrative and Personal Writing

By Wren Greaney, History major, Biological Sciences & Community Development minor, ’17 Author’s note: “I started to look into entomological research as a result of learning about insect diversity in ENT100. I came across a study regarding ants’ fascinating advanced ability to cultivate fungi. I thought it was incredible that we have agriculture in common with those tiny insects, and became interested in how ants are similar to and perhaps more advanced than humans in some ways.”

So, Where are we With Abortion?  

Posted Posted in Health and Medicine: Literature Reviews

Reproductive Health Care Access in the United States: A Review of Literature By Madison Dufek, Biological Sciences with an emphasis in Neurobiology, Physiology, and Behavior, Minor in Communications, ’17 Author’s Note:   “Reproductive health care/family planning refers to services that provide birth control, prenatal care, and pregnancy termination procedures. This is a subset of health care that is in my opinion talked about too much but not enough – especially when it comes to abortion. I initially wrote this piece for an upper division writing class focusing on women’s health; but reproductive health care access soon transformed into a cause that is now a great passion of mine. The results from the literature had me fiercely enraged yet profoundly inspired. Women all over the world today are denied necessary health care because of skewed perceptions of family planning and women as a whole. Abortion services – be it via medication […]

Manufacturing Synthetic Blood Vessels That Grow with the Patient

Posted Posted in Health and Medicine: General

By Bukre Coskun, Cell Biology, ‘18 Author’s Note: “The ability to build new organ parts may seem like science fiction, but tissue engineering is a fast-growing field that has already yielded promising results. After reading that congenital heart defects are the most common type of birth defect, I was compelled to do some research on how tissue engineering has sought to improve existing surgical options. After coming across a couple articles about acellular valve conduits, I decided to report on the research of the University of Minnesota, which was recently published in Nature Communications.”

Got a Spare?

Posted Posted in Health and Medicine: Case Reports

By Harrison Manacsa, Biological Sciences, ‘17 Author’s Note: “This started as a case study I wrote on my friend’s chronic kidney disease for UWP104F. She was diagnosed during our freshman year; and I see the impact of her weekly dialysis on her family, diet, and college schedule. Knowing that a kidney transplant will greatly improve her health, I researched the processes one would undertake to donate their kidney. As it turns out, there are numerous factors one should consider. My article briefs on the current state of kidney donation. It is an expression of my amazement of turning our bodies into tools.”

Christianson Syndrome

Posted Posted in News

By Madison Dougherty, Biochemistry and Molecular Biology ‘18 Author’s Note: “I wrote this paper as a supplement to a presentation in my genetics class. I believe it is important to inform people about mental disabilities other than the most commonly seen disorders, such as Down Syndrome or autism. This paper serves to educate readers about Christianson Syndrome, an X-linked genetic disorder that, although phenotypically similar to more widely-known disorders, is actually quite different at the genetic level.”

A New Role for Mosquitoes in Disease-Outbreak Prevention

Posted Posted in Environment, Health and Medicine: Case Reports

By Chantele Karim Author’s Note “I became interested in vector-borne diseases in Spring of 2016, when I conducted an independent study on the ethical advancement of genetically modifying technology. I discussed the potential application of CRISPR to mosquitoes, primarily Aedes aegypti, in the effort to combat dengue. Throughout my extensive research, the danger posed by mosquitoes was commonly emphasized by diverse sources. It was thus surprising to read that Microsoft’s Project Premonition is based on the assertion that mosquitoes can be useful to us in our quest to control vector-borne diseases. My intrigue led me to research the project further to better understand its method, application, and potential.”

Current discussion surrounding Dr. Canavero’s human head transplant proposal

Posted Posted in Health and Medicine: Case Reports

By Carly Cheung, Microbiology, ’17 Author’s Note: “The controversial topic of a human head transplant caught me by surprise when I read about it in the news. I was curious about the psychological, immunological, and technical complications of this procedure. After researching it, I became more knowledgeable and open-minded towards it.”

Review of Horizontal-flow and vertical-flow constructed wetlands’ efficiency to remove pathogen indicators in tropical area

Posted Posted in Environment, Special Report

By Yufei Qian, Environmental Horticulture and Urban Forestry, ‘18 Author’s Note: “As an international student, English is not my first language. I never felt such confidence writing in academic English before taking Professor Matthew Oliver’s UWP 104E class. This class is about writing in science, and the literature review is the basis of many scientific research projects. To develop future experiments, literature reviews help researchers maintain an up-to-date understanding of the field, identify strengths and limitations in current experimental designs, and get inspirations for their own research. I am interested in ecology and the relationship between humans and environment, so I decided to write about constructed wetlands. Since I am a plant-lover, a focus in my literature review research is plant selections and impacts on E. coli removal efficiency. UWP 104E is a great class that combines my interest with professional writing and helps me overcome language barriers in academic […]