UC Davis Hosts DataRescue Event To Archive Climate Research

Posted Posted in Environment, Special Report

By N. J. Griffen, English, ‘17 Author’s Note: “I chose to write about this topic as a response to one of the many uncertainties that exists under our newly elected president, Donald Trump. More specifically, this article is meant to encompass the nationwide effort by scientists, professors, researchers and archivists to safeguard, backup and protect work conducted in the realm of climate science. This topic, I believe, should be integrally important to most residents of this planet; due to the fact that we have no choice but to live the entirety of our lives here on earth. Therefore, my interview of the archivists at UC Davis seeks to uncover the motives and connotations that the DataRescue Davis event assumes.”

Epigenetics and Intergenerational Health

Posted Posted in Genetics

By Wren Greaney, History major, Biological Sciences & Community Development minor, ’17 Author’s Note: “I became interested in the impact of epigenetics after reading an article about the effects of environmental pollution on generations beyond the population subjected to the pollution. So much focus in human biology is placed on genetics; it is fascinating that a closely related and significant topic exists that is unique from genetics itself. As epigenetic research progresses, I think it will find a large role in advancing healthcare as well as our understandings about humans’ biological identities.”

Tuberculosis 101

Posted Posted in Health and Medicine: General

By Connie Chen, Microbiology, ‘16 Author’s Note: “Many areas of employment, especially within health care, require employees to take a test to see if they have been exposed to tuberculosis (TB). Today, it is believed that one third of the world’s population is infected with some form of TB. However, not many people truly understand what tuberculosis is or what it does. I hope that after reading this, you will have a better understanding of TB.”

The Past, Present, and Future of Genetically Modified Organisms

Posted Posted in Genetics

By Rachel Hull Author’s note When I began my research for this piece, I was primarily interested in the controversy over the fairly new bill in the United States requiring labels on foods that contain genetically modified ingredients. Little did I know that as I was gathering my sources, a new GMO dispute would emerge, this one revolving around bioengineered non-browning apples. Thus I switched my focus from the bill to the arrival of these apples to stores across the U.S. — an arrival that means an investigation into the history and science behind genetically engineered food products is even timelier than I originally thought.

Molecular Mechanisms Leading to FXTAS Development and Therapeutic Perspectives

Posted 1 CommentPosted in Health and Medicine: General

By Candice Vieira, Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, ’17 Author’s Note: After researching Fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS) treatment methods for a UWP 104F assignment, I learned that current FXTAS therapeutics is limited to symptomatic treatment. Most articles emphasized the need to better characterize the molecular mechanisms underlying FXTAS development to develop drugs specifically for FXTAS. Therefore, I questioned what researchers currently know regarding molecular events that lead to FXTAS signs and symptoms and how this knowledge can aid in drug therapies. This motivated me to prepare a literary review, intended to educate and inform practicing clinicians, especially neurologists and psychologists, about recent findings and the future directions for FXTAS research. For this assignment, we were expected to synthesize recent articles […]

To Infinity and Beyond: A Review of “The Life of Pi, and Other Infinities” by Natalie Angier

Posted Posted in Book Review

By Lo Tuan, Neurobiology, Physiology, and Behavior and Managerial Economics, ’17 Author’s Note: I wrote this review as an assignment for a UWP course that investigates the role of science in society using different lenses and models. It was a scintillating experience engaging in scientific reading and writing while evaluating the relationship between science and society. This paper proved to be a useful exercise for me to communicate scientific information to the general public in a clear and accessible manner.

Our Newest Neighbors?

Posted Posted in News

By Nicole Strossman, Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, ‘17 Author’s Note: “I decided to write this piece after seeing news headlines announcing the potential of life on planets in a nearby star system. As this is a topic that fascinates many people, myself included, I decided to investigate the new discoveries. While the research on the particular planet mentioned in the various news articles is still fairly new, it has brought about renewed interest in the search for life beyond our planet. This article aims to describe what these recent discoveries are, and show the implications they have for astronomers.”

Information Night for The Aggie Transcript

Posted Posted in News

2017 is a new year and can be a time to explore undergraduate publishing. Come learn more about The Aggie Transcript! If you are interested in finding out who we are, how to become an editor, or how to get a submission published, come out to our info night! Light refreshments will be provided. We hope to see you there! Date, Time and Location: 1/17 from 7:10-8pm Wellman 27

Life Science According to Trump: An Examination of Claims and Facts

Posted Posted in Environment

By Wren Greaney, History major, Biological Sciences & Community Development minor, ’17 Author’s Note: “I decided to write this article on the Wednesday after the presidential election. After the long whirlwind of campaigning, it seemed that many unanswered questions lingered. Health is one of the most immediate concerns for many people, and when accurate information about health exists, I think it should be provided so that individuals can make informed decisions. This article is an attempt to address a small fraction of the health concerns that were raised during the course of the presidential campaign.”

A Glimpse into Mitochondrial Replacement Techniques

Posted Posted in Biology, Health and Medicine: Case Reports

By Rachel Hull, Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, ’19 Author’s Note “I decided to write this piece after stumbling across several news articles in October of this year heralding the birth of the first ever ‘three-parent baby’ and thinking to myself that something seemed to be missing in these stories. What started as some casual digging into the history of three-parent babies soon turned into a more general investigation of assisted reproductive technologies. The information I found was not only interesting but also very pertinent, as new advances could increase the role these technologies play in our society.“