The Infant Airway Microbiome Linked to Childhood Asthma

Posted Posted in Environment, Genetics, Health and Medicine: General, News

By Shivani Kamal, Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, ’17 Author’s Note: “I am pursing a career in pediatrics and wanted to familiarize myself with new research regarding health and development of children. I was amazed at the advancements of medical technology which allow us to understand diseases and create potential cures, previously never thought possible. My purpose for writing this review is to show scientific audiences the most current research on how bacteria in the respiratory microbiome has an impact on asthma. Recently, much research initiated by the Human Microbiome Projects (HMP) proved that the bacteria living on and inside humans contribute to the health and disease of the body. This review is meant to educate scientists on the most recent information […]

What is Myasthenia Gravis?

Posted Posted in Health and Medicine: General

By Shubhang Bhatt, Neurobiology, Physiology, and Behavior, ’15 Author’s Note: “What is Myasthenia Gravis?” aims at informing the readers about the mechanism of action, symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment of Myasthenia Gravis. Fatigue and muscle weakness is something that today’s working population has learned to ignore, and this has prevented MG from early detection. Proper treatment is necessary for this potentially life-threatening condition. I decided to write about this topic after reading a case study for one of my internships. I hope the readers will look out for signs like the drooping of eyelids, muscle weakness, and difficulty in swallowing for the early detection of this rare autoimmune disease.”

Human Health and Safety Impacts of Recombinant Bovine Somatotropin Consumption

Posted Posted in Health and Medicine: General, News

By Danielle Kassatly, Genetics and Genomics, ’16 Author’s Note: “This piece aspires to encourage consumers to critically interpret the scientific facts presented in everyday advertisements. Our society assumes that rBST and many other synthetic chemicals are detrimental to health, this essay emphasizes the importance of challenging fallacious argument in order to fairly evaluate the use of rBST.”

Blood pressure monitoring and antihypertensive treatment for dementia prevention: A Review

Posted Posted in Health and Medicine: General, Health and Medicine: Literature Reviews

By Holly Lam, Human Development, ’16 Author’s Note:   “I wrote this literature review as an assignment for UWP104F (Writing in the Professions: Health). We were able to choose any health problem of our interest and review current research pertaining to that topic. I chose to write about dementia particularly because it affects my grandmother. To this day, my family and I do not know how she went from being a fairly healthy 40 year old woman to being a person with Alzheimer’s disease. During my research, I came across an abundance of literature pertaining to the relationship between dementia and the blood supply to the brain. The notion of hypertension being a potential indicator of later dementia captured most […]

What is HIV?

Posted Posted in Health and Medicine: General

By Connie Chen, Microbiology, ’16 Scope This article was inspired by a friend who is an International Relations and Economics major. She was interested in the science behind HIV and AIDS because she only knew about the stigma carried with being infected with HIV and that it is an incurable virus. After talking to my friend for a few hours, I realized that many people don’t know too much about HIV besides how it spreads and that there is no current cure. My friend was amazed by how complicated HIV was and hopes that future policies about HIV and AIDS will have more background information rather than going with public opinion about the virus. The overarching goal of the paper […]

The Future of Surgery

Posted Posted in Health and Medicine: General

By Nicole Strossman, Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, ’17 What do you picture when you think about surgery? Most likely, you imagine a person having their body cut open, and then a surgeon performing what is necessary to fix the problem, whether that be removing a damaged organ or tissue, repairing damages internally, or performing some other procedure. In all of these cases, it is expected that the doctor makes a cut large enough so that he or she can see what is inside of the body and operates. However, a new method of surgery takes a radically different approach. Laparoscopic surgery, also called minimally invasive surgery, Band-Aid surgery, or keyhole surgery, is a relatively new surgical technique that is revolutionizing […]