Got a Spare?

Posted Posted in Health and Medicine: Case Reports

By Harrison Manacsa, Biological Sciences, ‘17 Author’s Note: “This started as a case study I wrote on my friend’s chronic kidney disease for UWP104F. She was diagnosed during our freshman year; and I see the impact of her weekly dialysis on her family, diet, and college schedule. Knowing that a kidney transplant will greatly improve her health, I researched the processes one would undertake to donate their kidney. As it turns out, there are numerous factors one should consider. My article briefs on the current state of kidney donation. It is an expression of my amazement of turning our bodies into tools.”

A New Role for Mosquitoes in Disease-Outbreak Prevention

Posted Posted in Environment, Health and Medicine: Case Reports

By Chantele Karim Author’s Note “I became interested in vector-borne diseases in Spring of 2016, when I conducted an independent study on the ethical advancement of genetically modifying technology. I discussed the potential application of CRISPR to mosquitoes, primarily Aedes aegypti, in the effort to combat dengue. Throughout my extensive research, the danger posed by mosquitoes was commonly emphasized by diverse sources. It was thus surprising to read that Microsoft’s Project Premonition is based on the assertion that mosquitoes can be useful to us in our quest to control vector-borne diseases. My intrigue led me to research the project further to better understand its method, application, and potential.”

Current discussion surrounding Dr. Canavero’s human head transplant proposal

Posted Posted in Health and Medicine: Case Reports

By Carly Cheung, Microbiology, ’17 Author’s Note: “The controversial topic of a human head transplant caught me by surprise when I read about it in the news. I was curious about the psychological, immunological, and technical complications of this procedure. After researching it, I became more knowledgeable and open-minded towards it.”

A Glimpse into Mitochondrial Replacement Techniques

Posted Posted in Biology, Health and Medicine: Case Reports

By Rachel Hull, Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, ’19 Author’s Note “I decided to write this piece after stumbling across several news articles in October of this year heralding the birth of the first ever ‘three-parent baby’ and thinking to myself that something seemed to be missing in these stories. What started as some casual digging into the history of three-parent babies soon turned into a more general investigation of assisted reproductive technologies. The information I found was not only interesting but also very pertinent, as new advances could increase the role these technologies play in our society.“

A Case Report of Tourette Syndrome

Posted Posted in Environment, Genetics, Health and Medicine: Case Reports

By Lo Tuan, Neurobiology, Physiology, and Behavior and Managerial Economics, ’17 Author’s Note: “I chose to write about Tourette Syndrome because someone who is dear to me was diagnosed with it. Watching him struggle at a young age, I could only imagine how difficult it must have been dealing with strange and disapproving looks from peers and teachers. Through the gradual decline of symptoms over the years, he learned to cope with his tics and sought to educate others about the syndrome. Inspired by his story, I wrote this case report in hopes of share his journey with others.”

The Fragile Physiology of Football Players

Posted Posted in Case Report, Health and Medicine: Case Reports, Narrative and Personal Writing

By: Esther Ebuehi, Human Development major, Nutrition Science minor ’16 Author’s Note: “This narrative case report describes an athlete’s shoulder injury and explores the way injuries are treated in the world of collegiate athletics. While I was writing this piece, I recognized just how little time non-athletes spend thinking about the impact of sports injuries. Many NCAA athletes have life-long sports injuries, but we rarely talk about this issue as a campus community. There’s a national discourse revolving around injury prevention in football, and I believe this is a topic college students (athletes and non-athletes alike) should be thinking critically about.”

Case Report: Sjogren’s Syndrome

Posted Posted in Health and Medicine: Case Reports

By David Ivanov, Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 2015 Sjogren’s syndrome, like other autoimmune diseases, can be difficult to diagnose definitively, and often relies on a handful of signs and symptoms that can vary substantially from case to case. The only signs considered markers for Sjogren’s are anti-SSA and anti-SSB antibodies, and while anti-SSB is more specific, elevated levels of anti-SSB are actually less common in patients with Sjogren’s syndrome than anti-SSA, leading to some ambiguity in diagnosis. A seventeen year old female patient presented with a large, soft, sublingual cyst on the left side of the floor of her mouth. While she reported no pain, the cyst was first spotted about a year earlier, and had been growing steadily. Visible swelling was observed on the left side of her face under her jaw line. Surgery was performed to remove the cyst, and an adjacent salivary gland was removed as well. […]