All posts by Aggie Transcript

Manufacturing Synthetic Blood Vessels That Grow with the Patient

By Bukre Coskun, Cell Biology, ‘18

Author’s Note:

“The ability to build new organ parts may seem like science fiction, but tissue engineering is a fast-growing field that has already yielded promising results. After reading that congenital heart defects are the most common type of birth defect, I was compelled to do some research on how tissue engineering has sought to improve existing surgical options. After coming across a couple articles about acellular valve conduits, I decided to report on the research of the University of Minnesota, which was recently published in Nature Communications.”

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Got a Spare?

By Harrison Manacsa, Biological Sciences, ‘17

Author’s Note:

“This started as a case study I wrote on my friend’s chronic kidney disease for UWP104F. She was diagnosed during our freshman year; and I see the impact of her weekly dialysis on her family, diet, and college schedule. Knowing that a kidney transplant will greatly improve her health, I researched the processes one would undertake to donate their kidney. As it turns out, there are numerous factors one should consider. My article briefs on the current state of kidney donation. It is an expression of my amazement of turning our bodies into tools.”

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A New Role for Mosquitoes in Disease-Outbreak Prevention

By Chantele Karim

Author’s Note

“I became interested in vector-borne diseases in Spring of 2016, when I conducted an independent study on the ethical advancement of genetically modifying technology. I discussed the potential application of CRISPR to mosquitoes, primarily Aedes aegypti, in the effort to combat dengue. Throughout my extensive research, the danger posed by mosquitoes was commonly emphasized by diverse sources. It was thus surprising to read that Microsoft’s Project Premonition is based on the assertion that mosquitoes can be useful to us in our quest to control vector-borne diseases. My intrigue led me to research the project further to better understand its method, application, and potential.”

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Current discussion surrounding Dr. Canavero’s human head transplant proposal

By Carly Cheung, Microbiology, ’17

Author’s Note:

“The controversial topic of a human head transplant caught me by surprise when I read about it in the news. I was curious about the psychological, immunological, and technical complications of this procedure. After researching it, I became more knowledgeable and open-minded towards it.”

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Review of Horizontal-flow and vertical-flow constructed wetlands’ efficiency to remove pathogen indicators in tropical area

By Yufei Qian, Environmental Horticulture and Urban Forestry, ‘18

Author’s Note:

“As an international student, English is not my first language. I never felt such confidence writing in academic English before taking Professor Matthew Oliver’s UWP 104E class. This class is about writing in science, and the literature review is the basis of many scientific research projects. To develop future experiments, literature reviews help researchers maintain an up-to-date understanding of the field, identify strengths and limitations in current experimental designs, and get inspirations for their own research. I am interested in ecology and the relationship between humans and environment, so I decided to write about constructed wetlands. Since I am a plant-lover, a focus in my literature review research is plant selections and impacts on E. coli removal efficiency. UWP 104E is a great class that combines my interest with professional writing and helps me overcome language barriers in academic English.”

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Factors Involved in the Development of Alzheimer’s Disease

By Nicole Strossman, Biochemistry & Molecular Biology, ‘17

Author’s Note:

“I chose to write this review for my UWP 104F after reading about potential treatments for Alzheimer’s Disease. As this is a disease that affects such a wide variety of people, and currently has no cure, I wanted to educate myself about the developments regarding it. Although the potential treatments are still under investigation, they provide hope for people affected by a currently incurable disease.”

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The Consequences of Tropical Deforestation

By: Wincy Yu, Biological Sciences, ‘17

Author’s Note:

In light of climate change and environmental talks among world leaders, as well as rising media attention for endangered species around the world, I realized that people were concerned about the consequences, but may not have paid attention to the underlying reasons. Inspired by an ecology class I took last year, I wrote this piece to discuss one of the reasons for climate change and ecosystem loss, which is deforestation.

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The multi-functional protein kinases: ATM and ATR

By Carly Cheung, Microbiology, ‘17

Author’s Note:

“The goal of this paper is to portray the multifunctionality of proteins involved in the cell and how interconnected one process is to another, even though two processes appear to be unrelated. I am fascinated by the system of signal transduction in our cells and admire how elaborate and complicated the network is. This is best shown by examining the two proteins, ATM and ATR, that are known for their functions in cell cycle regulation and DNA break repair. The paper explores the changes in their transduction pathways seen in mammals with cancer, metabolic diseases, and cardiovascular diseases.”

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Looking Deeper into Life: How a Nobel Prize Winner Advanced Microscopy

By Madison Dougherty, Biochemistry and Molecular Biology ‘18

 

Author’s Note:

“I was encouraged to attend and review Nobel Prize winner Eric Betzig’s lectures on campus, and I am extremely glad that I did. As a Biochemistry and Molecular Biology major, I did not think that I would find microscopy very interesting, but after listening to Betzig talk about his developments in the field, I felt a new sense of appreciation for microscopy, and even for telescopes and space. If you are interested in astronomy, physics, chemistry, biology, or all of the above, I highly encourage you to watch and absorb the wealth of information that he has to share with the scientific community. Full video presentations of Betzig’s lectures can be found on the CBS Storer Lectureship website: http://biology.ucdavis.edu/seminars-and-events/storer-endowment/past-lectures/2016-2017.html

 

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Aggie Transcript Interview—Dr. Walter Leal

By Bukre Coskun, Cell Biology, ‘18

Author’s Note:

“As a student in Professor Walter Leal’s biochemistry class, I was inspired by his dedication to motivating students and obvious enthusiasm for his field of research. Professor Walter Leal has achieved international recognition for his research on the molecular basis of insect communication and insect olfaction. Leal, a professor in the UC Davis Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology and former chair of the UC Davis Department of Entomology, has made significant strides towards understanding how chemicals deter mosquitos. He has identified key mosquito receptors that can guide the development of better mosquito repellents to prevent the spread of deadly diseases. He is a past president of the International Society of Chemical Ecology, an elected fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), and the first non-Japanese scientist to earn tenure in the Japan Ministry of Agriculture. I had a conversation with Professor Leal about his path to research, his philosophy on teaching, and the significance of his work with insects.”

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